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Obit. Transcriptions


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#1 Jeff Jahn

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 01:35 PM

First off I set up a special fact called Obiturary. In it i enter date and paper name and location if known. They a use a note to transcribe the obituary. My question to others those is how to you handle the mispellings and typos when you transcribe? I usually enter they typos and mispellings into my transcription. Those of coarse may make it appear that i may have typed it wrong. Also citys are sometimes spelt as they sound instead of how they are which can make hard for searching for location. When ya add a note to that fact or change?

#2 Dennis

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 01:55 PM

QUOTE(Jeff Jahn @ Jan 12 2006, 01:35 PM) View Post

First off I set up a special fact called Obiturary. In it i enter date and paper name and location if known. They a use a note to transcribe the obituary. My question to others those is how to you handle the mispellings and typos when you transcribe? I usually enter they typos and mispellings into my transcription. Those of coarse may make it appear that i may have typed it wrong. Also citys are sometimes spelt as they sound instead of how they are which can make hard for searching for location. When ya add a note to that fact or change?


Jeff...

I usually leave them "as is" and use the [sic] to indentify same.
from the internet dictionary..
sic -- Thus; so. Used to indicate that a quoted passage, especially one containing an error or unconventional spelling, has been retained in its original form or written intentionally.

Dennis


#3 Kathy Fowler

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 06:24 PM

I, too, have an Obituary fact. I treat errors in the original document in different ways.

When it's a simple typographical error of a harmless word, I correct it. If someone typed "Chruch" and meant "Church," I'll put in, say, "First United Methodist [Church] of Rome." This is a case where actually including the original error makes no sense.

But if the error is a date or the misspelling of a place or person's name, I'll type the original, generally with the correction in brackets afterwards: "He is survived by his aunt, Bettie Ross [Hoss]." Or "She is survived by her daughter, Mary Smith, of Falrico [Valrico], Fl."

I figure I'm sort of obligated to fix errors that might lead other researchers astray (try finding "Falrico" on a map; and if you're looking for Bettie Ross in Rome, Georgia, you won't find her--except where she's been mis-indexed in the county's cemetery book). But if I'm quoting an obituary (or any other source), I'm obligated to quote it correctly and to indicate any changes I've made to the text.

Sometimes I do just use "sic," but only when it's obvious what the correct text should be. So I could put "First United Methodist Chruch [sic] of Rome." But I think it reads more clearly the way I've given it above. And I don't have to worry about spell-check accidentally correcting "Chruch" somewhere, leaving me with the confusing "First United Methodist Church [sic] of Rome."

#4 Jeff Jahn

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Posted 12 January 2006 - 06:34 PM

Thanks for suggestions will have to try some when I relook at my obits.