Jump to content


Photo

Basic USB 101 Help


  • Please log in to reply
2 replies to this topic

#1 Cliff

Cliff

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 73 posts

Posted 30 December 2008 - 11:47 PM

I know this is very basic to all of you computer garu's - but I'm frozen with fear. In keeping up in the daily blog, I was convinced that a USB Flash Drive would be a good investment. Got the SanDisk Cruzer Micro USB 2.0 Flash Drive 16GB. This was on sale and cost me $49 CDN.

To my surprise I was even able to format it. This is what scares me silly. I have a laptop to take with me and my Desktop for my primary work. I want the USB for RootsMagic data only, including pictures.

I have 3 genealogy files as follows: 1) My wife's family data 2) my genealogy data with and without sources and 3) my genealogy data with sourced data only.

I don't know if my 3 books above are stored seperately or all in the same subdirectory! I need to be careful not to mix them up. Could use some expertize here please!

Also is the data that goes to the USB drive a backup or copied files? Any basic tips on protecting my genealogy data would be most welcome. I never even knew about USB flash drives till reading the blog. Talk about being out of the loop! blink.gif huh.gif


Cliff

#2 Doug Couch

Doug Couch

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 44 posts

Posted 31 December 2008 - 03:12 AM

Although very different physically and how they work, a flash drive's storage capability works exactly the same as a regular drive. So, copying whatever you want to it is fine.

Best to organize your databases. You called them "books"...so it is unclear what you're dealing with. If you are talking about RootsMagic database files, then each one has a separate name, no matter where each one is stored. If you have not modified the storage location for any of them, most likely they are all in the same folder. Whatever you set your database files storage folder to be...they're there. If you didn't choose one of your own, they will be in the default folder. Look for a folder which has any files in it with the .rmg extension at the end. You will find SETS of files all with the same name and different extensions (dot whatever). The ".rmg" file is the main file, but the entire set of files with the same name are required for RootsMagic to create the database when you load the ".rmg" file.

Before you deal with the flash drive, separate the various databases into separate folders and open them from there when you want them. Name the folders the same as the databases. Wouldn't hurt to test and make sure they open correctly (i.e.-you got all the files in each set together to the new folders).

Then copy entire folders with their respective databases to your flash drive. That way anytime you want to copy any particular database, you can just copy the entire folder, and paste it elsewhere.

Final note: If you do this, remember that anytime when going in either direction, if you copy the database back to the other location, it will overwrite the existing one. Even though you might want only the newer version, MAKE A COPY OF THE EXISTING DATABASE FIRST!!! In the folder you will be pasting TO...create a folder called "backup"...and create a backup copy of the files about to be overwritten before pasting in the new version to the regular folder. This is not about backup done from RootsMagic...but a copy of the working files. Once you make a copy-paste backup and paste in the new version as well, then when you open the database, make a (RootsMagic function) backup to that drive for extra protection.

If you copy regular working files (sets) back and forth, making backups each time, you will save yourself a lot of heartache. And that is better than using RootsMagic's backup function, which is not as efficient for moving databases back and forth because it requires conversion and reconversion in each direction, making it more possible for error creation and propagation. The program's backup feature should be for an extra redundent backup. It is also better than exporting and importing GEDCOM files, which also require conversion and reconversion in each direction. Copy-Paste is a much more reliable transfer method.

#3 mapleleaf

mapleleaf

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts

Posted 31 December 2008 - 04:50 AM

QUOTE(Doug Couch @ Dec 31 2008, 04:12 AM) View Post
If you copy regular working files (sets) back and forth, making backups each time, you will save yourself a lot of heartache. And that is better than using RootsMagic's backup function, which is not as efficient for moving databases back and forth because it requires conversion and reconversion in each direction, making it more possible for error creation and propagation. The program's backup feature should be for an extra redundent backup. It is also better than exporting and importing GEDCOM files, which also require conversion and reconversion in each direction. Copy-Paste is a much more reliable transfer method.


Hi Doug,

I hate to jump in on Cliff's question, but you brought up an interesting topic - the RootsMagic backup.

I share my database with others by making a backup in RootsMagic (File > Backup) and sending it to them. They then rename their current database, and restore the backup to a new location (File > Restore Backup). If it looks OK, they delete the old database.

I know you're talking about going from a flash drive to a computer and back and forth. So I'm wondering if what I'm doing is not the best thing?

When you're copy/pasting, are you doing this from Windows Explorer? If I do this instead of the backups, would it make sense to zip the database then send that to my colleagues? Instead of sending them a backup zip?

If so, when they receive the zipped copy of the database (not the backup zip), they would paste that into the folder where they store databases, into a newly-named folder. If they don't make a new folder, when they unzip the copy and move it to the database folder, it will replace the existing folder of the same name. Now how would they open this new copied database? File > New, then find the new folder and click the .rmg file?

Thanks,
Debbie




~ Debbie