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29 February 1900


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#1 SomebodySmart

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 02:19 PM

I go to add an event date. I try adding 29 February 1900 and the background remains yellow to suggest an invalid date, but that was a valid date in Greece and Russia where the Julian Calendar was observed.



#2 robertjacobs0

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Posted 17 May 2020 - 06:52 AM

Convert to Gregorian & add an explanatory note to the person entry?

 

But if you accept the yellow background but add a proper Gregorian sort date I think RM7 will still compute ages properly.



#3 zhangrau

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Posted 17 May 2020 - 07:38 AM

Convert to Gregorian & add an explanatory note to the person entry?

 

But if you accept the yellow background but add a proper Gregorian sort date I think RM7 will still compute ages properly.

 

I just did a test. RM uses the "primary" Date, not the Sort Date, in the age calculation.



#4 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 17 May 2020 - 07:46 AM

It sounds to me like the best you can do is to enter the date as 28 Feb 1900 and add a note that says that the date was really 29 Feb 1900 on the Julian calendar and that the Julian calendar was still being observed in the locale where the event take place.

 

To tell you the truth, I didn't realize that the Julian calendar was still being observed in any locale as late as 1900. But I did realize that Julian vs. Gregorian dates could be a serious problem and that Gregorian calendar was not adopted in every locale at the same time. It can make for a convoluted mess when dealing with dates.

 

Jerry



#5 pstaveley

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Posted 17 May 2020 - 04:14 PM

Most Eastern Orthodox countries adopted the Georgian Calendar by 1924. However, the Julian Calendar is still used today by most Eastern Orthodox churches, so their Christmas Day is 7th January and in most years they celebrate Easter on a different weekend to other Christian countries.



#6 robertjacobs0

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Posted 17 May 2020 - 10:09 PM

zhangrau, is that true if the primary date is improperly formatted or an impossible date with a yellow warning box? The help file suggests otherwise, and I have verified it by entering "sometime in 1905" as the primary date and "2010" as the sort date. The tag sorted correctly to 2010.



#7 TomH

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Posted 18 May 2020 - 02:32 AM

No age calculation for a pair of dates one of which is yellow bg. A valid sort date sorts, of course.

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#8 robertjacobs0

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Posted 18 May 2020 - 07:32 AM

Oy! I read the help too quickly and didn't test the age calculation. I apologize for the oversight.

 

"Yellow" dates do show up in reports. If I were faced with 29 February 1900 I think I'd enter it as "29 February 1900 Julian" & put the sort date to 28 February 1900. If I felt that reports needed an age calculation I'd edit the sentence templates appropriately. As to the on-screen display, age calculation is pretty easy if one starts with 1900 :).



#9 Renee Zamora

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Posted 18 May 2020 - 04:57 PM

29 Feb 1900 was not a leap year that is why it's not showing as a valid date.

 

"The Gregorian calendar, which now serves as the standard calendar for civil use throughout the world, has both common years and leap years. A common year has 365 days and a leap year 366 days, with the extra--or intercalary--day designated as February 29. A leap year occurs every four years to help synchronize the calendar year with the solar year, or the length of time it takes the earth to complete its orbit around the sun, which is about 365¼ days.

The length of the solar year, however, is slightly less than 365¼ days-by about 11 minutes. To compensate for this discrepancy, the leap year is omitted three times every four hundred years.

In other words, a century year cannot be a leap year unless it is divisible by 400. Thus 1700, 1800, and 1900 were not leap years, but 1600, 2000, and 2400 are leap years."


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