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#1 chzuck

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Posted 22 December 2019 - 03:47 PM

Why is the quality so poor in the Rootsmagic App?  They are practically unrecognizable.



#2 Renee Zamora

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 09:42 AM

Not everyone has a lot of space on mobile devices. That is why the images are reduced. Not really meant to be a view. It's more so to tell what type of document you have. 


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#3 chzuck

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Posted 23 December 2019 - 09:57 AM

Thank you.  I thought it was due to photo that I was inserting in the media gallery.  If I view my genealogy via my a Rootsmagic website the photos look good.  So if I want to actually view the photos I know to use my website instead of the app.



#4 Cherylwedly

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 09:21 AM

hi Is "Resolution" the primary parameter of determining the quality of the image? For example, given that I have two original images taken from two different mobile devices, how can I tell which one image has better quality in addition to wild guessing by naked eyes?

#5 zhangrau

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Posted 27 January 2020 - 04:51 PM

hi Is "Resolution" the primary parameter of determining the quality of the image? For example, given that I have two original images taken from two different mobile devices, how can I tell which one image has better quality in addition to wild guessing by naked eyes?

Higher resolution is essential for best-quality images. But you could have two copies of a photo at the same resolution that look differently, particularly if one of them has been compressed in a "lossy" format (like JPG or JPEG). Storing photos in "non-lossy" formats like PNG or TIF will prevent loss of clarity through opening & re-saving. JPG is well known to lose fine details of an image as it gets compressed and re-compressed.



#6 Dick-TMG

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Posted 30 January 2020 - 05:45 PM

Resolution is a tough thing to determine. Resolution is usually what our eyes detect and that can be the result of very good contrast or very poor contrast, or poor color choices, out of focus etc., and poor actual pixel count.

 

If you want to see what the actual resolution is you can see it very easily in windows. I've just converted to windows 10  so I won't tax my poor memory as to how older versions work but in windows 10 you just have to right click on an image say in file explorer and then select properties and go to details. There it will give you the size in pixels.

 

I believe the lossy formats, after the initial conversion to lossy, take some time and many saves and edits to actually notice the change in picture quality. Jpegs for example when saved they go through an algorithm to determine which pixels can be dropped with minimal loss of quality. Then when they open that file those deleted pixels must be rebuilt. Save it again and the process repeats. Eventually some actual visible image components are visibly altered. Just opening and closing may not do any damage to the image - it must be saved to get the additional loss.

 

Defined by https://flat-icons.c...sy-vs-lossless/

 

"Lossy compression means that the image loses quality every time it is saved (think of JPGs). A lossless compression (as in the case of PNG images) means that the quality stays the same no matter how many times the image is saved."