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Cleaning up sources

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#1 floridaresearcher

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 06:43 AM

When I started researching years ago, I entered each census source by county. Example, 1850 U.S. Federal Census Population Schedule, Henry, AL. I was consistent with that, and then recorded the details for the individual when I cited the source. I was viewing images on microfilm at a library and the older sources show the library as the repository. The problem is that years later I have added images from Ancestry and FamilySearch but I didn't update my citations so I don't know where I obtained the images. Shame on me!

How should I correct this?

I have so much cleanup after moving from Family Tree Maker to RootsMagic and I've been away from researching for about 4 years.

I'm learning so much from following this forum. Thank you for any advice.

#2 zhangrau

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 01:46 PM

The original repository for all US federal censuses was:

U.S. Census Bureau
4600 Silver Hill Road
Washington, DC 20233
USA

Phone:
Cell:
Fax:
E-mail:
Website: https://www.census.gov

Note: Mailing Address:
Via U.S. Postal Service (USPS):
U.S. Census Bureau
4600 Silver Hill Road
Washington, DC 20233

Via private carriers (FedEx, DHL, UPS, couriers and suppliers):
U.S. Census Bureau
4600 Silver Hill Road
Suitland, MD 20746



#3 Nettie

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 03:14 PM

Several years ago, and in the tips and hints section of this forum, for RM5, i've posted another way of doing census records.  I f you search my name or just census records you will find the topic.  All the places that have digital copies of any census records are the current repository for that digital copy. What Zhangrau gave you is the original holder of the original census record. I make sure every record that i have found has the NARA microfilm no. and roll number and then the page number no matter if it is stamped [s] or handwritten [p] = penned in the citation.Some times you will find more than one Handwritten number on a sheet. I also altered the Source Templates that are EE codied so that all censuses no matter where in the US for one census year are on one Source Citation.  Like 1800, 1810, etc...  

 

This is what my copy looks like for 1840.  Which is a 2 page sheet and as the 1930 census. 

Footnote:
O.M. DeCourcy, 1840 Federal Census, United States, Campbell County, Kentucky, p 137 [s]; Microfilm = (digitized by ancestry.com) M704, roll 106.

Short Footnote:
O.M. DeCourcy, 1840 Federal Census, United States, Campbell County, Kentucky, p 137 [s].

Bibliography:
United States, 1840 Federal Census. Microfilm = (digitized by ancestry.com) M704. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records.

Research notes:
Census Taker, Station of Alexandria, Campbell County, Kentucky. Husband and wife are in the age group of 20 to 29. O. M. wrote comments on the second page of the census report as his job was the census taker.

Repository:
National Archives
Washington, DC 

 

As you see I used NARA for Repository, because I did not know if ancestry.com or familysearch.org owned the microfilm copy or the NARA. archives.  I do know that original microfilm copies are at the NARA archives, do not who is the real owner of the digirized copy.   At the census bureau web page on line it will probably state that information.  

 

I also use one Source Citation for each journal/magazine, like William and Mary Quarterly.   I do not do like Jerry does his.  A lot of conversations/discussions have been had on Source Citations in the previous years forums. 

Nettie


Genealogy:
"I work on genealogy only on days that end in "Y"." [Grin!!!]
from www.GenealogyDaily.com.
"Documentation....The hardest part of genealogy"
"Genealogy is like Hide & Seek: They Hide & I Seek!"
" Genealogists: People helping people.....that's what it's all about!"
from http://www.rootsweb....nry/gentags.htm
Using FO and RM since FO2.0 


#4 floridaresearcher

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Posted 21 September 2019 - 04:20 PM

Thank you!  



#5 Don Newcomb

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Posted 29 September 2019 - 04:44 PM

The original repository for all US federal censuses was:

U.S. Census Bureau
4600 Silver Hill Road
Washington, DC 20233
USA

 

 

I personally laid hands on a volume of the 1850 census at the National Archives. 



#6 zhangrau

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 05:07 PM

 

I personally laid hands on a volume of the 1850 census at the National Archives. 

 

Cool. There are also lots of libraries that hold microfilm copies of census records. All of those are valid repositories, right?



#7 Don Newcomb

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 10:11 PM

 

Cool. There are also lots of libraries that hold microfilm copies of census records. All of those are valid repositories, right?

 

I suppose they are valid repositories for the microform copy. My point was that the originals are held, not at the Census Bureau but at the National Archives. I'm not actually all that pedantic, I think all my US Census sources have Ancestry.com as the repository.



#8 zhangrau

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 07:15 AM

Since I developed my own custom source template, which includes two repositories in the Bibliography sentence, I have been working on converting ALL of my 16K Master Sources to this template. It's a slow process, generally following the progress of current research.

 

Here's what my 1930 US census source looks like:

Footnote: U.S. Census Bureau, 1930 Federal census, general heading for all citations from this census (Washington DC: U.S. Census Bureau, 1930, no catalog #), [Page].

Short Footnote: U.S. Census Bureau, 1930 Federal census, general heading for all citations from this census, [Page].

Bibliography: U.S. Census Bureau,. 1930 Federal census, general heading for all citations from this census. Washington DC: U.S. Census Bureau, 1930, no catalog #. -- Repository 1: Ancestry.com, Provo UT. -- Repository 2: Library of Michigan, Lansing MI.

Source comments:
Ancestry.com, 1930 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, The Generations Network, Inc., 2002), United States of America, Bureau ofthe Census, Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930, Washington,D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930.



#9 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 09:13 AM

I also struggle with repositories and what do they even mean. The concept seems so simple, and yet it really isn't.

 

Before census images were routinely available online, I got them from microfilm "at the library". Except that I have easy access to three different libraries and one LDS Family History Center. Most of the census images I was interested in was available at any of the four locations.  Each of the four locations has different collections that extend well beyond census collections, and some things I need might be available at only one or two of the four locations. Plus, each has different hours and ease of parking. So who knows which of the four I might go to for a particular census image. Each location has their own little filing system for census microfilm, none of which has anything to do with NARA numbers. But ultimately, the reels of microfilm are identical even though the filing systems are different between the locations. So what earthly difference does it make where I found them provided I give state, county, year, district and enumeration district, and page number? (Well, page number can be an adventure no matter how you do it because the same census page often is identified by multiple sets of page numbers).

 

Here's another example of repositories not being so simple. There is a Bryan family book which was self published in 1978 by a distant Bryan cousin. Compiled family histories are not as good as sources as are actual primary documents such as birth, death, and marriage certificates; census records; wills; settlements; etc. Nevertheless, this particular book is an invaluable resource. I know of repositories for three copies of the book. One is at one of the four library/FHC locations I mentioned in the previous paragraph. The second is at the Tennessee State Library and Archives in Nashville, about a three hour drive from my house. The third is LDS microfilm which back in the day you could pay to order for viewing at a FHC. The book is in the FamilySearch catalog, but it's not yet available for viewing online. So which repository should I list if I want someone to read one of my reports and to be able to find a copy of the book? Oh, and really there is a fourth copy I know about, and it's the one I really use. It's on a bookshelf in my living room. But I'm not inviting the world over to my house to view this particular book.

 

And here is a last example of repositories not being so simple. It's a real citation that very recently appeared in FamilySearch Family Tree.

 

 "United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch...3/1:1:QK4P-YRTT : accessed 2 October 2019), Kathleen Black, Tennessee, United States, 05 Mar 2006; from "Recent Newspaper Obituaries (1977 - Today)," database, GenealogyBank.com (http://www.genealogybank.com : 2014); citing Knoxville News-Sentinel, The, born-digital text.

 

The underlying obituary appeared in my local newspaper, the Knoxville News-Sentinel. I long since obtained the obituary from the newspaper. It is really very nice that you often can get such obituaries these days without having to live in the town where the obituary appeared and without having go to the library and spin a bunch of microfilm. But just look at what this citation says. The obituary appeared in the Knoxville News-Sentinel. It was later copied online to GenealogyBank.com. It was still later copied to online to familysearch.org. The citation is without reproach in following all the rules correctly and in following this paper trail. And yet it seems not quite the best citation in the world, somehow or other. It's too long and wordy and it's confusing. And indeed, FamilySearch doesn't even have the text of the obituary, which is what you really want. FamilySearch does have a short precis of the obituary, but not the full text. To see the full text, you have to go to GenealogyBank.com or to a library (or to NewsBank.com which probably means going to a library - GenealogyBank.com is owned and operated by NewsBank.com, and is just an extraction from NewsBank.com). I just don't know what's best, and I don't know what the "real" repository really is, unless you count the image of the real, original newspaper obituary which may be found on my computer.

 

By the way, I do subscribe to GenealogyBank.com, and it's a wonderful resource for obituaries that I cannot access as easily as I can obituaries from the Knoxville News-Sentinel. Here is an example of one of my citations using GenealogyBank.com.

 

Obituary: Cox, Mary Elizabeth Rader; The Greeneville Sun [Greeneville, Tennessee], 2 November 2011, viewed at www.genealogybank.com on 2 June 2013.

 

I make no claims of perfect Evidence Explained compliance, but it seems to me that this does everything you need and is just so much simpler than the citation I quoted above from familysearch.org. I do use an RM Source Template of my own design for such obituaries. Since I don't really understand how the concept of repository is supposed to work for such things, my source template obituaries includes a [Viewed] variable and a [Website] variable. It may be that my [Website] variable is really a repository. If so, so be it.

 

The familysearch.org citation above doesn't fit in well with the RM template system. I think about the only thing you can do with it is to create a Master Source with a Free Form template and then to copy and paste the familysearch.org citation as a whole into the Footnote field in the Free Form template.

 

In case anybody asks, here is the complete Footnote sentence from my obituary Source Template. It tries to take care of obituaries no matter where they come from - a real newspaper, a newspaper's own Web site, a funeral home's Web site, or any other Web site such as GenealogyBank.com. Occasionally, I will run into a new situation that the template will not handle. If so, then I just add that situation to the template.

<?[ObitMissing]|No obituary:|Obituary:> [DeceasedName:Reverse]; <[Memorial], ><<i>[FuneralHome]</i>|<i>[Newspaper]</i>>< /[[NewspaperPlace]/]><, [NewspaperDate:plain]><, [NewspaperPage]><, viewed at [WebSite]< on [Viewed:plain]>>.

Jerry



#10 zhangrau

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Posted 02 October 2019 - 08:34 PM

Source templates, citations, and repositories can create an incredible variety of headaches.

I make no attempt to understand the "rules" establed in Evidence Explained.

Instead, I want my documentation to point a future reader (and maybe double-checker) to what I found and where I found it.

 

So here's an example of an obituary using my custom template:

 

Footnote: Anonymous, A Statesman Gone - Abraham Lincoln's Running Mate Is Dead: Hannibal Hamlin, the Veteran Statesman, Joins the Majority - A Sketch of His Life (Bay City MI: The Sunday Times, 5 July 1891, no catalog #), [Page].

Short Footnote: Anonymous, A Statesman Gone - Abraham Lincoln's Running Mate Is Dead, [Page].

Bibliography: Anonymous,. A Statesman Gone - Abraham Lincoln's Running Mate Is Dead: Hannibal Hamlin, the Veteran Statesman, Joins the Majority - A Sketch of His Life. Bay City MI: The Sunday Times, 5 July 1891, no catalog #. -- Repository 1: The Bay City Times, Bay City MI. -- Repository 2: GenealogyBank.com, Naples FL.

 

It wouldn't surprise me if an enterprising researcher could find the same obituary on microfilm at the Alice and Jack Wirt Public Library in Bay City. It's a wonderful place to visit, with a well-managed local history and genealogy room.

 

Here's another example, from after the time when I started carefully noting the page and column info for a printed obit. Same template, just used a bit more effectively.

 

Footnote: Anonymous, Death Notice - Arthur H. Cullen 1928-1996 (Detroit MI: Detroit Free Press, 10 November 1996, page 18 - bottom of column 2), [Page].

Short Footnote: Anonymous, Death Notice - Arthur H. Cullen 1928-1996, [Page].

Bibliography: Anonymous,. Death Notice - Arthur H. Cullen 1928-1996. Detroit MI: Detroit Free Press, 10 November 1996, page 18 - bottom of column 2. -- Repository 1: Detroit Free Press, Detroit MI. -- Repository 2: Newspapers.com, Lindon UT.