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Funeral Attendees


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#1 Madge

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Posted 05 July 2019 - 11:43 AM

Apologies if this has been asked before, how do others record the names of people who attend funerals.  I've got a couple of obituaries from the USA that give details of Pall Bearers etc., here in the UK we usually just list the people who attend funerals along with their relationship to the deceased.  I would like to record under individual names that they attended the funeral, a sentence along the lines of "he/she attended the funeral of (name of deceased) at (Place, Church)".

 

If someone could write me a sentence along those lines I would be really grateful as I get very bogged down and they never seem to make sense, or does anyone have any better ideas.

 

Thank you.



#2 Nettie

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Posted 05 July 2019 - 02:10 PM

You could try this in the file of person.   Set up a Fact Called Funeral/Memorial Service. Activate the fields below <[     ]>.  Many Church services are called here in the states Memorial Service, which designates cremation.  I am a retired Church organist and I know this is what services are being called. 

 

[person] attended the funeral of <[Desc]> < [Date]>< [PlaceDetails]>< [Place]>.

 

I have gotten used to writing this, but the F1 which is the Help file has some more choices you can use. 

 

Others may have some different choices also.


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#3 Madge

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 08:01 AM

Nettie, that is wonderful, the sentence does exactly what I want.  Thank you so much.



#4 Nettie

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Posted 06 July 2019 - 10:08 PM

Your welcome.  I have also creatged another Fact called Heir with the same type of sentence, to say they were mention in a person's will. Which in my opinion, helps validate the person is a son or daughter or..... to the person whose will I am quoting.


Genealogy:
"I work on genealogy only on days that end in "Y"." [Grin!!!]
from www.GenealogyDaily.com.
"Documentation....The hardest part of genealogy"
"Genealogy is like Hide & Seek: They Hide & I Seek!"
" Genealogists: People helping people.....that's what it's all about!"
from http://www.rootsweb....nry/gentags.htm
Using FO and RM since FO2.0 


#5 Madge

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 04:23 AM

I haven't found many wills yet, the few that I do have aren't very helpful for family history purposes, apart from some astronomical amounts of money that seem to have disappeared or completely by-passed me. :)  :)  :)



#6 Kamolga

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 04:39 AM

Are the protestants recording who participate to funerals? Never saw anything like this from European catholic churches...


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#7 Bob C

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 05:02 AM

Are the protestants recording who participate to funerals? Never saw anything like this from European catholic churches...

US centic because of the practice of publishing obituaries and funerals in newspapers which were used to inform the public at large.



#8 Trebor22

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 07:29 AM

US centic because of the practice of publishing obituaries and funerals in newspapers which were used to inform the public at large.

I have found a number of newspaper articles in the UK listing funeral attendees or at least some of them, might be hard to tell if a complete list,  and some guest lists at weddings - all late-ish 19th century or  early 20th



#9 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 08:36 AM

In my experience, U.S. obituaries seldom list attendees, at least not exactly. But they typically do list pallbearers, and sometimes they list "honorary pallbearers".

 

For me the best evidence that comes from obituaries is usually family relationships - parents, spouses, children, and grandchildren. Sometimes they will list special friends, special cousins that the person might have been raised with, special aunt and uncles the person might have been raised by, etc.. And obituaries usually give a date and place of death, date and place of the funeral, date and place of the burial. Sometimes but much less often they give date and place of birth, date and place of marriage, etc.

 

Family relationships in obituaries can sometimes require careful interpretation. Children of spouses are often listed as children of the deceased. This can be more or less appropriate if the deceased adopted or otherwise helped to raise the children. But sometimes children of spouses are listed as children of the deceased if the deceased and his or her current spouse were widow and widower when they were married in their 70's. And the interpretation of family relationships can require especially careful interpretation with heavily blended families that come about due to divorces or deaths of spouses.

 

The genealogical value of U.S. obituaries has tended to increase through the years. They are paid for by the family, and newspapers charge by the word. So early obituaries were often very short, announcing only the death and the funeral arrangements so that people knew when and where to attend the funeral. Modern obituaries are much longer and usually provide much more information about family relationships and the person's life history.

 

Jerry

 



#10 Don Newcomb

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Posted 07 July 2019 - 04:48 PM

Are the protestants recording who participate to funerals? Never saw anything like this from European catholic churches...

 

There's a lot of regional and temporal variation in obituaries in the USA. I've seen them that list the full names and relationships of all close relatives. Some name the minister, all the pall bearers and honorary pall bearers but none of the relatives. Some don't name anyone.  The current trend is to go on and on ad nauseam about the deceased's hobbies, etc. 



#11 Kamolga

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Posted 08 July 2019 - 12:12 AM

Ah ok, thanks! They used to be quite small in our cases. Nowadays they are published online but still not much information: Name of the spouse, first name of children (only the ones alive), death date, death place, birth date, birth place and residency place (not address). Then full info regarding ceremony, burial, etc. ….basically apart from the photo, not much different than the newspaper. Unfortunately, the newspapers are not digitally archived (yet?), so you can not "search" for a person to see if there was a publication, it is much easier for people who passed away after 2000 (websites). 


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#12 Madge

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Posted 08 July 2019 - 02:31 AM

Most times when I've gone to a funeral there will be someone at the door taking names and often the local paper will run an Obituary which will give these names plus the relationship to the deceased and who they are representing, great for picking up previously unknown relationships and background to the life of the deceased.

#13 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 08 July 2019 - 07:45 AM

 Unfortunately, the newspapers are not digitally archived (yet?), so you can not "search" for a person to see if there was a publication, it is much easier for people who passed away after 2000 (websites). 

 

I think the archiving varies somewhat throughout the U.S. I grew up in a city with two daily newspapers. Obituaries would often appear in both papers, and I have discovered that the text of an obituary would usually be identical between the two papers but sometimes the text could vary significantly. Also, sometimes obituaries appeared in one paper but not the other. So I always check with both papers.

I have the great good fortune that microfilm for one of the two papers has been scanned, indexed, and placed online for 1922-1990. The theory is that digital archives are online from 1990 to the present.so they didn't need to scan past 1990. Unfortunately, the digital archives for 1990-2000 are extremely incomplete, and I don't know why. So 1990 to 2000 is a bit of a doughnut hole where I still have to look at microfilm. From 2000 to the present, the archives are pretty much all online.

 

More and more obituaries are being published online by funeral homes and never appear in a newspaper. My experience with the digital archives for funeral homes is that the archives are extremely inconsistent. For some funeral homes, the digital archives seem well maintained and for other funeral homes the digital archives seem pretty non-existent.

 

I worry in the long term about the viability of things like obituaries, city directories,and phone books. All of them are going online and paper is going away. That's great to do a quick search for the present, but possibly not so great for long term archives.

 

Jerry