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RootsMagic & Linux


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#1 robertjacobs0

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 01:45 PM

Microsoft’s latest shenanigans show increasing abilities to reduce users’ control over their own machines and increased tendencies to do just that — recent alarming article in Forbes Magazine is making me think of moving away from Windows if the trends continue. Has anyone successfully run RootsMagic in a virtual machine under Linux?

 



#2 Trebor22

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 03:03 PM

No, I've not run RM under Linux but I have been wondering if the 'rewrite' cpuld mean RM8 running under Linux? Might be a nice little USP :-)



#3 Renee Zamora

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 03:30 PM

RootsMagic 8 will not have a Linux version on release. It's on the enhancement request list but I do not know if or when we will see a Linux version. The big issue with Linux support are the multiple flavors of Linux, we cannot write to them all. 


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#4 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 04:18 PM

RootsMagic 8 will not have a Linux version on release. It's on the enhancement request list but I do not know if or when we will see a Linux version. The big issue with Linux support are the multiple flavors of Linux, we cannot write to them all. 

 

I'm really not interested in running Linux on the desktop.  But my experience with Linux suggests that from the application side such as RM, the multiple flavors of Linux are probably not a big deal. Server side software is another thing entirely.

 

I do presently have a Linux server in my house - 16 processor cores, 64GB memory - but I have never run RM on it and I'm sure I never will. What I run on it are scientific research type C++ programs that I write and which require enormous amounts of resources. I develop on Windows with Visual Studio, and I run the resultant EXE files under Linux under Wine. For what I'm doing, it works great but I'll stick with my Windows desktop.

 

Jerry



#5 PaperStainer

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Posted 18 March 2019 - 03:50 AM

I am currently running RM7 on my Linux desktop using WINE. It works very well.

I can see no reason why running it in a Linux virtual machine would be an issue.



#6 Don Newcomb

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 09:08 AM

Confession: I have not been able to get RM-to-go to run under the Linux/Wine combination, so I installed a copy of RM on my Linux laptop to use at libraries. I then use it to access the data files on my RM-to-go memory stick. It functions reasonably well for the tasks I need to accomplish at the library (e.g. data entry & edit, saving to-do lists, etc). I can't claim to have tested every feature but it does well enough for my limited needs. I've also run it on a Mac laptop the same way.

 

I agree that it would be nice were RM to support the combination of Linux & Wine. 



#7 crustycurmdugeon

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 07:49 AM

RootsMagic 8 will not have a Linux version on release. It's on the enhancement request list but I do not know if or when we will see a Linux version. The big issue with Linux support are the multiple flavors of Linux, we cannot write to them all. 

That's ridiculous. You don't need to write to them all. Debian-based would be a good start and would embrace the largest proportion of Linux users.



#8 crustycurmdugeon

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 07:54 AM

I've been running RM7 under Linux (KDE) with a Win7 VM. It works a charm. I've not tried Wine under Linux because I've never liked Wine and won't put it on my machines.  It will be truly sad if RM8 will not run in the same config (Win7 VM). If it can't, then we're done and I'll be forced to return to Gramps or find another alternative.



#9 crustycurmdugeon

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 07:56 AM

Microsoft’s latest shenanigans show increasing abilities to reduce users’ control over their own machines and increased tendencies to do just that — recent alarming article in Forbes Magazine is making me think of moving away from Windows if the trends continue. Has anyone successfully run RootsMagic in a virtual machine under Linux?

 

Yes, running in a Win7 VirtualBox VM under KDE Linux for a couple of years now. Works beautifully.



#10 uberdorf

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:55 PM

I have run RM 7 in a Windows 10 VM guest using Virtualbox on a Linux host, and I currently run RM 7 on Wine 4.0.3 on Linux.  There are advantages and disadvantages to each method.

 

--running RM7 native on a Windows guest in a VM

-disadvantage-you are running two OS at once, Windows as a guest and Linux as a host, or vice versa.  You will use more RAM and CPU cores this way.  You also need a Windows license, and if Windows is connected to the internet there is that problem too.

-advantage-you can clone the Windows VM as a backup in case things get infected in the Windows guest.  Also RM 7 looks better running natively in Windows.  Windows is sandboxed by the virtual machine so it can't corrupt your host machine unless you do something stupid.

 

--running RM7 on WINE in Linux

-disadvantages-you have WINE installed, so if you open a Windows virus through a WINE browser or something, it can access your files just like in Windows.  WINE can run .exe files.  WINE does not render Windows fonts well, which not everyone knows how to fix. 

-advantage-RM 7 on WINE uses less RAM and CPU cores than having a VM.  RM 7 on WINE opens much faster, since you don't have to open a VM and start Windows.  You don't have to transfer files through a VM when putting pictures and such in RM.

 

--instructions for installing RM 7 in Wine on Linux (as of January 2020)

1. go to https://wiki.winehq.org/Downloadand follow the instructions for installing the stable version of WINE.  I prefer using current stable versions of WINE from the website over the older distro packages in the repositories, which you could try if you want.

2. run winecfg in terminal to configure WINE and click yes to install various packages like MONO and GECKO.  Set it to Windows 7 or 10 compatibility.

3. run the RM 7 exe, it should work perfectly now



#11 uberdorf

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 05:05 PM

That's ridiculous. You don't need to write to them all. Debian-based would be a good start and would embrace the largest proportion of Linux users.

I agree.  Many Linux distros are based on Debian (including Ubuntu and Linux Mint), so if you write Rootsmagic into a .deb installer for Debian it will work on most linux distributions.  The other distributions like Fedora use .rpm installers, but they aren't used as much as the Debian family.  However there is an even simpler method used by Firefox and Minecraft for other distributions. 

 

What you do with firefox and Minecraft in some distributions is to download the app compressed into a tar file with all dependencies it needs.  So get it working, compress it into a .tar file, and let people download it.  It's that simple.  You wouldn't even need a .deb or .rpm installer.



#12 uberdorf

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Posted 29 January 2020 - 09:47 AM

Linux has plenty of options that essentially do the same thing.  There are actually three universal ways of packaging for Linux (that I can think of), so that you only have to build the app once and it will work for most distributions.  Snap would probably be the best option for selling an app that will work on most distributions.

 

1. snap.  This is the method sponsored by Canonical, which makes Ubuntu, but it will work on most distributions.  https://snapcraft.io/Google and Microsoft both use the snap store, it provides a framework so that the app-maker packages it once for the snap framework (the website claims it can take 30 minutes to make the snap) and then any linux user with the snap framework installed can install the snap.  An advantage for for-profit app developers is that the system is friendly to proprietary and for-profit companies.  This might be the best option for rootsmagic.

 

2. flatpak.  This is very similar to snap in that flatpak offers a framework in which an app can be packaged once for flatpak and it will work on most distributions, if flatpak is already installed/enabled on the customer's linux computer.  https://flatpak.org/ Flatpak is more geared for open-source instead of for profit companies, so I don't know how that would work.

 

3. a compressed tar file.  You make the app, compress it with its dependencies, and let people on linux download it.  I have to admit I know the least about this option, but I have used it since Minecraft and Firefox both use this method in addition to other methods.  They both have deb installers too, in addition to a tar, but that is beside the point.