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Identifying Wikitree references


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#1 keithcstone

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Posted 16 August 2018 - 09:51 AM

I'm wondering if there's a recommended way to document the Wikitree reference number for an individual. I get emails about changes to various names I'm tracking and would like to tag them Wikitree Stone-302 just like there's a FamilySearch XX9N-YY0M reference somewhere when you "match".

 

Obviously I'd like to do this in a way someone beside me would recognize it.



#2 Renee Zamora

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Posted 16 August 2018 - 09:55 AM

If your not using the Reference Number fact for anything else that could be used. Otherwise I would probably go with a custom fact. 


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#3 reborrell

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 09:39 AM

I have a custom fact for WikiTree.com and for Wikipedia.com.

I drop the full web link in the description field.

I also do a PDF file print of the page and attach that as a media page for that person.

Sometimes I also copy and paste the text from the page into my notes.

Might not be the best method but it works well for me.

I find that printing web pages as PDF files and attaching them as media files works well.

#4 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 01:00 PM

I'm a big fan of PDF files in general, but for purposes of my work with RM they have a problem. Namely, I use GedSite to make Web pages from my RM database. GedSite does a good job of supporting media files that I have linked into RM because it will place the media files into the Web pages that it is making. GedSite takes the PDF files that I have linked into RM and places them in the Web pages it is creating just like it places JPG and PNG files into the Web pages it is creating. But Web browsers don't support PDF files. A user can download a PDF file from the Web and then can view it, but that's not the same thing as viewing it directly in the browser.

 

My problem then becomes creating JPG or PNG files in situations where it's much easier or more convenient to create PDF files. This is especially a problem with multiple pages such as you might encounter in a scrolling browser window. My #1 go to trick is that I use Snagit for screen captures. It has a couple of different options for capturing scrolling windows as you might encounter with a browser. If all else fails, I do make a multi-page PDF file with the browser and use the free version of PDF XChange Viewer to convert it to JPG or PNG. The only disadvantage is that the free version of PDF XChange Viewer creates multiple image files from a multi-page PDF. But that's the best solution I presently have.

 

The overarching issue with PDF files is that as wonderful as they are, they are really text files and not image files. Lots of users don't believe this, but it is true. They are rich text files that can contain embedded images but that's not the same thing as an image file. It's no different than embedding images in a Microsoft Word file, in an Excel spreadsheet, or in a PowerPoint file. And it's further confusing because it's very common for a PDF file to contain a single embedded image and no text. But it's still a text file and not an image file.

 

Jerry

 



#5 Bob C

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 02:39 PM

 "But Web browsers don't support PDF files. A user can download a PDF file from the Web and then can view it, but that's not the same thing as viewing it directly in the browser."

 

Both Chrome and Firefox now have built in PDF viewers that can open in the browsers.

 

To view PDF in Chrome https://support.goog.../6213030?hl=en

It is automatically enabled in Firefox which opens them in the same tab. https://support.mozi...f-files-firefox

I don't use Edge or IE so I don't know about them.

 

Bob

 



#6 Trebor22

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 03:10 PM

 

 "But Web browsers don't support PDF files. A user can download a PDF file from the Web and then can view it, but that's not the same thing as viewing it directly in the browser."

 

Both Chrome and Firefox now have built in PDF viewers that can open in the browsers.

 

To view PDF in Chrome https://support.goog.../6213030?hl=en

It is automatically enabled in Firefox which opens them in the same tab. https://support.mozi...f-files-firefox

I don't use Edge or IE so I don't know about them.

 

Bob

 

 

I have tripped over the same problem as Jerry, although not with gedsite, perhaps its a common problem with ged to html programmes? As you say browsers will normally display .pdf files so I'm not quite sure what the problem is but I did wonder if gedsite / other programmes might produce a 'fix' if they are aware of the problem? Perhaps a 'link' to the pdf file is required rather than trying to 'embed' the file in a page?

It would be nice if pdf's made the journey from RM to a website.



#7 Bob C

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 03:31 PM

The PDF files that I view in my browsers are mainly links and embedded PDF files are usually hosted on another server or at another location. I know ssrn has a button "Open PDF in Browser" that lets me read them in my browser.

 

An example of the code they use is:

 

<a href="Delivery.cfm/SSRN_ID3248286_code328150.pdf?abstractid=3248286&amp;mirid=1&amp;type=2" data-abstract-title="Compelled Decryption and the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination" id="viewPdf" title="Open Full-Text Paper in Browser" class="btn-blue-outline-third btn-download-pdf">
                        Open PDF in Browser
                        </a>



#8 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 07:34 PM

I need to stand seriously corrected. I remember a long history of browsers not supporting PDF files natively, but that obviously is no longer true. On my Windows 10 machine, I have four browsers installed - Edge, Firefox, Chrome, and the Avast secure browser. All four of them display PDF files just fine, and I haven't done anything with any of them to install PDF plugins. The PDF files just work by default.

 

The one minor glitch and its probably not worth worrying about is that there aren't any thumbnails on my Web pages for the PDF files (I do have thumbnails for my JPG and PNG files). Rather, there is a generic "this is a PDF file" icon for PDF files. But upon clicking that icon, the PDF file displays just fine. I therefore surely need to rethink my aversion to having PDF files on my Web site. As I said in my original comments, I'm a big fan of PDF files in general.

 

Jerry



#9 Trebor22

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 01:55 AM

The PDF files that I view in my browsers are mainly links and embedded PDF files are usually hosted on another server or at another location. I know ssrn has a button "Open PDF in Browser" that lets me read them in my browser.

 

An example of the code they use is:

 

<a href="Delivery.cfm/SSRN_ID3248286_code328150.pdf?abstractid=3248286&amp;mirid=1&amp;type=2" data-abstract-title="Compelled Decryption and the Privilege Against Self-Incrimination" id="viewPdf" title="Open Full-Text Paper in Browser" class="btn-blue-outline-third btn-download-pdf">
                        Open PDF in Browser
                        </a>

Perhaps I missed the point here - sorry if I did!

The problem I encountered - several years ago, so perhaps its different now - was that the web pages generated automatically by a gedcom to html programme did not correctly generate 'links' to pdf media so 'clicking' it did not open the pdf file - in a browser or Acrobat reader. I only had a few pdf's in the database then so removed them or converted to jpeg. I have lots of pdf's elsewhere on my website and they all work just fine accessed from links on pages I created manually.

I assumed from Jerry's original post that the same problem still existed with gedsite, and possibly  other programmes,  perhaps its time I retried them :-)



#10 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 05:57 AM

I still consider my work with RM and GedSite to be sort of beta test and not yet fully public, but you can look at an example page at http://jerrybryan.co...1117.htm#i27922     The PDF links are in the citations down at the bottom of the page. You can scroll down to the citations or click on one of the citation superscripts to get there. The PDF links are the Acrobat icons at the end of the citations.

 

Jerry

 



#11 Trebor22

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 07:29 AM

While it might be nice to have a 'preview thumbnail' I think it works rather well Jerry, I would have been happy with the result a few years ago when I had pdf's in my database. Time I had another look at the possibilities :-)