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Narrative Report - Capitalization / Spacing


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#1 mcphilbrick

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 05:58 PM

I'm hoping someone can help with narrative report issues.

 

  1. Why isn't the first letter of all sentences capitalized?
  2. Why isn't there space between the superscript at the end of one sentence and the first letter of the next sentence?

For an image of the report, see - http://heartlandgene...-questions.html

 



#2 zhangrau

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Posted 01 January 2018 - 07:24 PM

Perhaps because I tend to use a custom fact to introduce a separator bar in a couple areas of my narratives, I get the same non-capitalized error on following sentences. I fixed by introducing the :Caps modifier, as in [Person:Caps] for those following sentences. In paragraphs where the modifier wasn't needed, no big deal,



#3 mcphilbrick

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 07:30 AM

I think I've figured out the capitalization issue.

 

When I looked at the sentence structure, the [person] field wasn't capitalized -- i.e. it wasn't [Person]. When I changed it to [Person], the sentence began with a capital letter.

 

I found this issue with two fact types: Education and Residence (which I may have created). However, when I scan thru my fact type list, a large number have sentences that begin with [person] - including all of the LDS fact types which I don't use.

 

That brings up more questions:

 

  1. What is the 'normal' sentence structure for a fact type? i.e. should it start with [person] or is that an issue in my file?
  2. If the sentence structures should start with [Person], then what might have cause the majority of mine to start with [person]? (Note: my data was imported from Master Genealogist)
  3. If the sentence structures should start with [Person], is there an easy way to change all of them?


#4 TomH

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 09:14 AM

I wouldn't think that capitalisation of a variable name would make any difference to its expansion of the value. The absence of an ending punctuation in the preceding sentence should. I've tested for neither recently.


Tom user of RM7550 FTM2017 Ancestry.ca FamilySearch.org FindMyPast.com
SQLite_Tools_For_Roots_Magic_in_PR_Celti wiki, exploiting the database in special ways >>> Rmtrix_tiny.png app, a bundle of RootsMagic utilities.


#5 TomH

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 09:48 AM

Okay, now that I've looked into it further, it is the prepending of a new line (or anything) in the sentence template for the role that makes the [person] variable think that it is not the beginning of the sentence so it does not capitalize the pronoun. It has nothing to do with [Person] vs [person]. A solution is to replace [person] with [person:Proper] or [Person:Caps] when [person] is the first non-white space character in the sentence template. If you are going to the trouble of customising event sentences to have leading line feeds, that is the time to edit the [person] variable. Another solution is to reorganise the sentence template to begin with a clause or literal that you control for capitalisation so that the name-cycling [person] is always later in the sentence and the lower case pronoun is correct. And another is to change all instances of leading [person] to have modifiers that are insensitive to where the variable is, e.g., ;first, :last, :nick, :full... And a final one is to turn name-cycling off, if you can stand the repetition. Jerry Bryan pioneered the point-form narrative which eliminates the name (and other repetitive verbiage) from the person's section except as a heading.

 

In answer to your questions:

1. The standard built-in sentence templates generally use [person] at the start of the sentence. There is no reason that it should be first, except for Birth or the very first fact for the person as that controls the narrative heading (a silly design).

2. Prepended white space is causing your [person] to come out "he" or "she" where you want it to be "He" or "She".

3. No easy way to change all sentences; aptitude for SQLite can facilitate such mass changes with outboard tools.


Tom user of RM7550 FTM2017 Ancestry.ca FamilySearch.org FindMyPast.com
SQLite_Tools_For_Roots_Magic_in_PR_Celti wiki, exploiting the database in special ways >>> Rmtrix_tiny.png app, a bundle of RootsMagic utilities.


#6 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 11:32 AM

3. No easy way to change all sentences; aptitude for SQLite can facilitate such mass changes with outboard tools.

 

I obviously don't know what's going to be in RM8, but I think the difficulty in the maintenance of sentence templates is an area in serious need of improvement. I go even further and suggest that RM needs to be able to support multiple sets of sentence templates at the same time in the same database, with any particular set of templates selectable when a report is created. I'm thinking of things like English templates vs. French templates, verbose templates vs. terse templates, production templates vs. test templates. etc. (really, any kinds of templates that meet the needs of a user). And it needs to be much easier to copy sentence templates from one database to another. The present RM design largely prevents sentence templates from being copied from one database to another unless the target database is a new and empty database.

 

Jerry



#7 mcphilbrick

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 02:59 PM

Thanks for all of the replies!

 

I have one question left:

 

Does the space between sentences - lead or follow? In other words, does RM put in a space at the beginning of every sentence or at the end of every sentence.

 

I'm experimenting with the paragraph fact to make my narrative report more readable. With that (or the carriage return trick) implemented, the paragraphs have a blank space at the beginning.

 

Thus, I'm thinking that RM puts in the space at the beginning of the sentence.

 

I've resolved most of the other issues:

  • used [Person] instead of [person] on the sentence structure for my residence and education fact types. (I did not change any other fact types and they seem to be capitalizing correctly -- even at the start of a paragraph.)
  • made sure I didn't have any leading spaces to start a sentence (that was causing larger white space between sentences than other places)
  • made sure I had spaces within the <> brackets so that I didn't end up with extra spacing when something was left out of a sentence


#8 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 06:45 PM

 

Does the space between sentences - lead or follow? In other words, does RM put in a space at the beginning of every sentence or at the end of every sentence.

 

I'm not sure.  But whatever the case may be, I fix the bug (the blank that shouldn't be there) by editing the RTF file as follows ( before editing the RTF file with Microsoft Word).

   replace:   \vertalt  \f4\b       normal mode instead of regular expressions
   with:      \vertalt \f4\b 

Also, there is a bug in the XE entries for creating indexes - again, a blank that shouldn't be there. The bug causes no damage in the name index but it can really mangle your place index.I fix the bug by editing the RTF file as follows ( before editing the RTF file with Microsoft Word).

   replace:   _\xef65                where _ is a blank, normal mode instead of regular expressions
   with:      \xef65
   replace:   _\xef66                where _ is a blank, normal mode instead of regular expressions
   with:      \xef66

Finally, I get rid of excessive vertical white space by editing the RTF file with Microsoft Word. I enable "reveal codes" by clicking the Paragraph icon on the tool bar and doing a global replace of ^p^p^p with ^p^p multiple times until there are no more changes. I then disable "reveal codes" by clicking the Paragraph icon again. I set gutter control so the inner margins are suitable for binding. Finally, I highlight the indexes and rebuild them by hitting F9 so that that the indexes reflect the pagination after all the other changes. I also edit the format of the indexes with some bolding and different font sizes to improve the appearance of the index. It's easy to do but it's hard to describe in a narrative such as this. I would have to make a screencast to show how it's done.

 

Jerry