Jump to content


Photo

TreeShare Feature?


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 JoyceAE5

JoyceAE5

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 165 posts

Posted 18 May 2017 - 12:20 PM

Any idea on when this new feature will be available? The last I heard was that it would be released around the end of April.

 

Joyce



#2 TomH

TomH

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6173 posts

Posted 18 May 2017 - 12:27 PM

There is no announced schedule. Merely customer expectations and speculation. I don't expect it to be released before FTM 2017 whose scheduled release is now some 7 weeks ago and counting. That has turned into a phased growth of testers heading toward the 75,000 mark so that overall systems performance can be monitored and controlled before unleashing all customers. I would think that Ancestry would be wanting to do something similar with RM before allowing its TreeShare into the wild on top of the challenges it faces accommodating FTM FamilySync. 


Tom user of RM7550 FTM2017 Ancestry.ca FamilySearch.org FindMyPast.com
SQLite_Tools_For_Roots_Magic_in_PR_Celti wiki, exploiting the database in special ways >>> RMtrix-tiny.png app, a bundle of RootsMagic utilities.


#3 JimDavis79

JimDavis79

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 44 posts

Posted 19 May 2017 - 07:05 AM

Last week I saw Bruce Buzbee at NGS2017.  He said release was still about/ over a month away then, and they had quite a number of beta testers still working over the software.  Issues seemed to be making sure the link between RM and Ancestry could handle nearly any data set, including ones where the upload from the user contained errors.  I'm reassured by this, knowing as I do how hard it is to develop software.  RM isn't going to release poorly tested software and make their users test for them (are you listening, Microsoft?).  They seem to be pursuing a very conservative testing strategy.  that's good for us!

 

On a side note, many RM users came to the software when the (nearly) sole developer of The Master Genealogist stopped development due to his personal illness.  That company subsequently shut down, stranding users in moribund software.  I queried Bruce on succession planning at RM, a topic with which I have professional familiarity.  Bruce said there is a team of developers, each capable of carrying forward the work, and that the company is quite able to continue operations were someone to be unable to work.  This gladdens me, as I really don't want to repeat my TMG experience with RM.

 

So, all good news, except that we users have to continue champing at the bit for the new software.  I'll contain my enthusiasm.


Best regards, Jim

"When you shake my family tree, nuts fall out."


#4 RobJ

RobJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 56 posts

Posted 19 May 2017 - 11:14 AM

On a side note, many RM users came to the software when the (nearly) sole developer of The Master Genealogist stopped development due to his personal illness.  That company subsequently shut down, stranding users in moribund software.  I queried Bruce on succession planning at RM, a topic with which I have professional familiarity.  Bruce said there is a team of developers, each capable of carrying forward the work, and that the company is quite able to continue operations were someone to be unable to work.  This gladdens me, as I really don't want to repeat my TMG experience with RM.

 

I just wanted to offer my strong agreement with your thoughts on continuity planning.  The loss of a key developer is not the only threat we face either, as larger companies driven more by profit concerns than genealogy, may arbitrarily remove products (e.g. Ancestry.com and Family Tree Maker).  It's not something most home users ever think about, but it's something we should all be concerned about, the longevity and commitment of any developer or company behind the tools and web sites we use.

 

And a related concern, for any web sites storing our data or storing resources we use, is how well backed up and protected they are.  Ransomware is no longer just a threat to the ignorant, it's a real threat to EVERYONE!  Their capabilities are now good enough to attack and potentially compromise even the most knowledgeable of security trained professionals.  That means all of our irreplaceable data must be backed up in multiple ways that are not normally accessible, whether it's at home or at a remote site.  In my opinion, all companies involved with storing our data or the resources we need, need to publicly state what they are doing to keep it safe.  And then we need to follow through on that, use the tools and sites that are committed to secure data handling, and apply pressure to those without clearly stated goals, plans and procedures for succession and backups and keeping data secure.

 

I personally would like to see a movement started that places a high priority on data portability, a movement that applies pressure on the companies behind all of the tools we use, to ensure a high level of data interchangeability, to ensure that what we import is what we export, with as little as possible lost BETWEEN the tools.  I think there are competitive advantages for any company that attempts to achieve high levels of compatibility with as many as possible of the 'competition', knowing that while it makes it easy for users to leave them, it also makes it easier for users to trust them and come to them.  A user is much more likely to commit to a company that is committed to fully preserve their work even if the company does not fully support every feature in it, and export it all out safely, undamaged.  This way, users do not have to be as concerned with losing a primary tool or company they had committed their work to.  A part of the movement would necessarily be applying pressure on companies to commit to the standards, the latest GEDCOM standards obviously, and any others that enhance data interchangeability.  I'm somewhat new here, but it looks to me as if RootsMagic is in a good position to be a leader here.  (Once they finish the TreeShare, do some catchup, and fix the dreadful Compare Files tool, I'd like to see them work on total GEDCOM compatibility (import to export), then target data interchange support for some of the One Tree projects, like WikiTree, similar to their support for FamilySearch.)



#5 JimDavis79

JimDavis79

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 44 posts

Posted 22 May 2017 - 07:24 AM

 

[snip]

 

And a related concern, for any web sites storing our data or storing resources we use, is how well backed up and protected they are.  Ransomware is no longer just a threat to the ignorant, it's a real threat to EVERYONE!  Their capabilities are now good enough to attack and potentially compromise even the most knowledgeable of security trained professionals.  That means all of our irreplaceable data must be backed up in multiple ways that are not normally accessible, whether it's at home or at a remote site.  In my opinion, all companies involved with storing our data or the resources we need, need to publicly state what they are doing to keep it safe.  And then we need to follow through on that, use the tools and sites that are committed to secure data handling, and apply pressure to those without clearly stated goals, plans and procedures for succession and backups and keeping data secure.

 

I personally would like to see a movement started that places a high priority on data portability, a movement that applies pressure on the companies behind all of the tools we use, to ensure a high level of data interchangeability, to ensure that what we import is what we export, with as little as possible lost BETWEEN the tools.  [snip]

 

RobJ, love your thoughts!  I hadn't thought much about data portability, but there are certainly other areas where such a standard has been agreed.  On backup, when I teach digital methods locally, here's how I describe my own nitnoid backup schema:

 

Level 1:  Make a back-up copy of my RM data file every day.
Level 2:  Back-up my computer daily to an external hard drive.  This one happens to be a four disk RAID array.
Level 3:  Copy the entire contents of the external hard drive to another hard drive not less often than monthly.  Store the external hard drive in a media safe. Simple fireproof safes don't offer protection to media.
Level 4:  Rotate the Level 3 external hard drive offsite at least monthly. This could be to someone else's house, to a safe deposit box, etc.  I also copy from my desktop to my laptop, which travels with me.
Level 5:  Store important data in the cloud.  Encrypt the data in transmission and at-rest to prevent hacking.  For this, I use my own encrypted web site, with the OwnCloud open source software.
Level 6:  Spread copies of pictures and documents freely through the family.
 
Some of this will be beyond many users, but most of it can be done by anyone.  A bit off-topic, but important to repeat periodically.  I do not depend on any company or other person, no matter how wonderfully motivated, to care for my data as carefully as I should.

Best regards, Jim

"When you shake my family tree, nuts fall out."


#6 Rooty

Rooty

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 132 posts

Posted 26 May 2017 - 06:22 PM

Robj is not paranoid but prudent. 

 

Automatic backup to a local external drive (ie time machine), to a backup cloud service like backblaze, and to flashdrives (data only) rotated offsite (ie in your car) is a simple strategy most of us can follow. A truly insane plan is to have your genealogy file only in Ancestry's tender care.

 

Database transfer between programs is a serious issue and seems to be a deliberately anti-competitive strategy of many companies. When I tried to compare software to choose one to use, I quickly found gedcoms did not transfer data at all well. It is hard to know whether the sending software or the receiving one is at fault--probably both are.