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Source: Social Security Applications and Claims 1936-2007


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#1 framistat

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 03:10 PM

Would anyone like to share how they created their source for this index?  Thank you.

 

Source Information:
Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2015.
Original Data: Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007.



#2 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 06:09 PM

Disclaimer: I have become an extreme spitter of sources, so for many people my approach may not be appropriate .

 

I have created my own source template for the U.S. Social Security and Claims Index. The concept is that the source is the the U.S. Social Security and Claims Index, not ancestry.com, and not a generic "online database". If this database has not yet appeared at other Web sites, I am sure that it soon will. So I don't want to focus just on ancestry.com. My template will work no matter which Web site the database is found.

 

For a new individual for whom I'm capturing this information, I do the following.

  1. I make a new source using my source template for the U.S. Social Security and Claims Index.
  2. I capture the text from the ancestry.com screen by doing a ctl-A, ctl-C from ancestry.com and I paste the information into the Master Text portion of the new master source. A source lumper might paste the same information into the Detail Text portion of a citation. Actually, I usually first paste the text into a temporary Notepad window and clean it up a bit there before copying and pasting it a second time into Master Text.
  3. I capture an image of the ancestry.com screen. There are several ways to do this. The simplest way that every Windows system has is to do this is to do a Print Screen which captures the screen onto the Windows Clipboard. You then have to use a tool like Microsoft Paint or Irvanview (or many others), paste the image into the tool, and File->Save the image. I store all images for the U.S. Social Security and Claims Index into a single folder for that purpose, and the naming convention is something like doe_john_m_ss_app_and_claims_index.jpg  And you can also use screen capture tools such as Snagit which is a little easier than Print Screen. Except that for screen captures from Web pages, I have settled on the best way of doing a screen capture is to use Chrome, to use Chrome to "print" the screen, and to use Chrome's print dialog to save the "printout" into a pdf file so that my naming convention ends with pdf rather than with jpg. This makes sure that I capture the entire image from from browser, including any text that might be scrolled off the bottom of the screen.
  4. The data elements in my source template are Deceased_Name, Birth_Date, Death_Date, Web_Site, Database, and Viewed. All the data elements are in the Master Source and none of them are in the Detail area. That's what makes the sources completely split. I suppose my template would work just fine by marking some of the data elements be Detail items.
  5. The sentence template for the footnote sentence is U.S. Social Security Application and Claims Index: [Deceased_Name:reverse]<; viewed at [Web_Site]< on [Viewed:plain]>>. I'm not entirely satisfied with this template at this point, but the nice thing about using templates is that I can tweak the template in the future without needing to go back and touch each citation.
  6. The name for each Master Source is of the form *us social security application and claims index: Doe, John Andrew; viewed at ancestry.com on 14 November 2015 The purpose of the * at the beginning of the name is to force all my templated Master Sources to sort in front of all my older, non-templated Master Sources. I'm in the process of converting all my non-templated Master Sources into templated Master Sources, but that's a multi-year project. This naming convention forces all the Master Sources for the U.S. Social Security and Claims Index to sort together, and to sort in alphabetic order by name of the individual.

Jerry



#3 zhangrau

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Posted 29 November 2015 - 11:49 PM

I'm a source lumper, so my approach is somewhat different.
 
1. I created a new Master Source, using the Book, Basic format template.
    a. Master Source: US Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007
    b. Author /Ancestry.com/
    c. Title: U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007
    d. Sub-title: [blank]
    e. Publish Place: Provo UT
    f. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.
    g. Publish Date: 2015
    h. Master text - Source Comments: Original Data: Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007.

 

2. In use:

    a. Source Details: given surname birth-death [example: Lois Joan Adams 1929-2005]

    b. Detail text - Research Notes: copy-&-paste the record from Ancestry

 

3. Citations: memorize-&-paste to each person and fact/event mentioned in the record.



#4 Renee Zamora

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 10:09 AM

There are 3 different Social Security Source Templates. I would make a copy of one and edit it if needed. I have found no need to edit the one I use. 


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#5 framistat

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 01:38 PM

c24m48,
 
Thank you for the wealth of information you posted in answer to my question.
 
You and I work similarly.  I use Chrome and print to pdf.  I also use an older version of FastStone Capture for Windows (5.3, available free at oldversion.com) which is easy to use and very flexible.
 
 
zhangrau,
 
Given my career background in IT and database work, the lumper approach makes sense to me.  Thank you for posting the details of how you created and use your template, very helpful.
 
 
Renee, 
 
I just recently became aware of the availability of the Social Security Applications and Claims Index (SSACI).  This is not the same as the Death Index.  It is exclusive to Ancestry.com and just became available late July 2015:
 
----------
U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014
The Social Security Administration Death Master File contains information on millions of deceased individuals with United States social security numbers whose deaths were reported to the Social Security Administration. Birth years for the individuals listed range from 1875 to last year. Information in these records includes name, birth date, death date, and last known residence.
-----------
U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007
This database picks up where the Social Security Death Index (SSDI) leaves off by providing more details than those included in the SSDI. It includes information filed with the Social Security Administration through the application or claims process, including valuable details such as birth date, birth place, and parents’ names. While you will not find everybody who is listed in the SSDI in this database, data has been extracted for more than 49 million people.
-----------
 
I have only two Social Security source templates (RM 6 upgraded to RM 7) in my Master Source List:
U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-Current (Ancestry.com)
Free-form - this one may have been imported with Ancestry data, it contains no substitution fields
Social Security Death Index 
(SSDI) (FHL, online) - this one may have been provided with RM, it contains substitution fields.
 
Neither of these fit the SSACI.  
 
What version of RM are you looking at that includes three, and what are they?  
 
The reason I posted the question is because I was very disappointed that the most recent RM update (August 2015) didn't include a template for this major new source, that every customer is likely going to use.


#6 kbens0n

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 01:54 PM

I suspect these three from my RM 6 Source Templates list is what Renee referred to:

 

2015_11_30_145131.jpg


---
--- "GENEALOGY, n. An account of one's descent from an ancestor who did not particularly care to trace his own." - Ambrose Bierce
--- "The trouble ain't what people don't know, it's what they know that ain't so." - Josh Billings
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K e V i N


#7 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 02:22 PM

The new SSACI contains much more information than does the older SSDI. And indeed, my source template for the SSACI is my newest source template. I looked at at using my SSDI template for both the SSDI and for the SSACI. But ultimately, I decided on making a new template for the SSACI.

 

I haven't looked at the suitability of the built-in RM templates for use with the SSACI. But in general, neither we users nor RM should have to add a new source template every time there is a new online database. It should be possible to use a template - either a built-in one or one of your own design - for quite a few different databases. If I had been more creative I'm sure I could have finagled my SSDI template to work for the SSCAI. But it was just easier in this case to make a new template. Laziness may have overwhelmed my good sense.

 

Jerry



#8 framistat

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 04:02 PM

kbens0n,

 

Thanks... I was looking in the wrong place.  Happens when I pick this up again for the winter months...



#9 TomH

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 04:21 PM

 

Given my career background in IT and database work, the lumper approach makes sense to me. 

 

You may want to consider the pros and cons of lumping vs splitting in the context of compatibility and consistency with external databases. While lumping makes sense when applying data normalisation, it falls down when exporting to other systems and, increasingly it seems, importing results in extreme splitting. RootsMagic has a split (;-) personality in this regard. For more info, here is a starting point which will bring you back to long discussions in this forum: Sources - Adventures in Extreme Splitting


Tom user of RM7550 FTM2017 Ancestry.ca FamilySearch.org FindMyPast.com
SQLite_Tools_For_Roots_Magic_in_PR_Celti wiki, exploiting the database in special ways >>> RMtrix-tiny.png app, a bundle of RootsMagic utilities.


#10 framistat

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 04:50 PM

TomH,

 

Hello!  Thanks for that insight, and for the link.  I will do some reading.

 

 

C24m48,

 

I would be (am) astonished that RM would never add to its source templates.  Especially for a monster new source like SSACI.  What would new customers getting the latest version of RM think if it were missing?



#11 Renee Zamora

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 05:33 PM

I haven't had a chance to use the new database on Ancestry so I wasn't even thinking about it. If someone comes up with a nice Source Template I could put it on the RM4Templates website to share with others.


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#12 Laura

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 05:39 PM

You could also use the Basic Ancestry Database Template and treat it as any other Ancestry database.

I use Free form sources, but that is what I have done.

#13 Jerry Bryan

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Posted 30 November 2015 - 09:06 PM

I would be (am) astonished that RM would never add to its source templates.  Especially for a monster new source like SSACI.  What would new customers getting the latest version of RM think if it were missing?

 

Well, never is a long time for not adding source templates. But as I said previously, you don't really need a template for every database and there are probably existing templates in RM that can handle the SSACI just fine.

 

For example, ancestry.com has over 30,000 databases and RM has over 500 built-in templates. And yet I suspect that RM's 500 some odd templates will suffice for all or nearly all of ancestry.com's over 30,000 databases.

 

I think it is both a strength and a weakness of RM's built-in templates that the majority of them are based on Evidence Explained. EE is a wonderful resource and it is considered to be "the" authority on how to cite sources for genealogical research. And yet I frequently think that it is a bit too complicated and too abstract (and it's 885 pages long). My favorite example of abstractness is that it doesn't really tell you how to cite obituaries. Rather, it tells you how to cite newspaper articles and it just more or less assumes that obituaries are just special cases of newspaper articles. I don't think that's the right way to do it, but then I'm just a simple country boy. So my real point is that for better or worse the abstractness and generality of EE means that a new edition doesn't have to be published every time there is a new genealogical web site or a new database at an existing genealogical web site. The same is true for RM's built-in source templates.

 

Jerry



#14 Renee Zamora

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Posted 01 December 2015 - 12:37 PM

We already have users overwhelmed with all the source templates we have. Personally, I think they just need to be guides to various types of templates, then you make them your own. If someone creates one they think would be useful to others then they could share them. That way the user could decide to add it to their collection or not. 


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