Jump to content


Photo

Sentence template for 1870 U.S. census, agriculture schedule

sentence template agriculture schedule

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 motleycrew

motleycrew

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8 posts

Posted 26 September 2014 - 12:57 PM

I've found a few ancestors in Ancestry's "Selected U.S. Federal Census Non-Population Schedules, 1850-1880".  I enjoy seeing the information, but it requires quite a bit of typing to get it all in my database. I created a custom fact for the 1870 agriculture census.  The sentence template I created for it is long, and requires a lot of customization, but the customization is mostly deleting or filling in blanks, and not a lot of typing:  

 

 [Person:HeShe] owned farm property <[PlaceDetails:Plain]> [Place:Short] [Date]. The farm had a cash value of [customize]. The livestock included [#] horses, [#] mules and asses, [#] milk cows, [#] working oxen, [#] other cattle, [#] sheep, and [#] swine. The value of all livestock was $[#]. In the previous year, the farm produced [#] bushels of spring wheat, [#] bushels of winter wheat, [#] bushels of rye, [#] bushels of Indian corn, [#] bushels of oats, [#] bushels of barley, [#] bushels of buckwheat, [#] pounds of rice, [#] pounds of tobacco, [#] bales of cotton, [#] bales of wool, [#] bushels of peas and beans, [#] bushels of Irish potatoes, and [#] bushels of sweet potatoes. The value of orchard products was $[#]. [#] gallons of wine were produced. The value of produce of market gardens was $[#]. Dairy products were comprised of [#] pounds of butter [#] pounds of cheese and [#] gallons of milk sold. [#] tons of hay, [#] bushels of clover seed, [#] bushels of grass seed, [#] pounds of hops, [#] tons of hemp, [#] pounds of flax, [#] bushels of flax seed, [#] pounds of silk cocoons, [#] pounds of maple sugar, [#] hogsheads (hhds) of cane sugar, and [#] gallons of molasses were produced. Bees produced [#] pounds of wax and [#] pounds of honey. The value of forest products was $[#]. The value of home manufactures was $[#]. The value of animals slaughtered or sold for slaughter was $[#]. The estimated value of all farm production, including betterments and additions to stock, was $[#].

 

Maybe someone else will find this helpful. 



#2 motleycrew

motleycrew

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8 posts

Posted 26 September 2014 - 01:19 PM

Those of you who know how to use syntax will probably be annoyed by my use of the brackets for areas that need to be customized.  It works for me, but I'm open to suggestions for something better.  Have a great day.



#3 TomH

TomH

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5744 posts

Posted 27 September 2014 - 05:39 AM

So this is the default sentence template for this fact type and you customize it for each instance by filling in the [#]s?

Tom user of RM7550 FTM2017 Ancestry.ca FamilySearch.org FindMyPast.com
SQLite_Tools_For_Roots_Magic_in_PR_Celti wiki, exploiting the database in special ways >>> Rmtrix_tiny.png app, a bundle of RootsMagic utilities.


#4 Jerry Bryan

Jerry Bryan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2936 posts

Posted 27 September 2014 - 06:39 AM

A different way (though not necessarily a better way) is not to involve RM's sentence template facility in this process at all. Rather, all this information could be placed in the census note. If you did it it that way, you could have sort of a pseudo-template in a text file somewhere that you could copy and paste into the census note where you could fill in the blanks. Which approach is better depends (I think) on how you want your data to read in a report and on how easy you want it to be to interchange your data with other genealogy software via GEDCOM.

 

Jerry



#5 Laura

Laura

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4276 posts

Posted 27 September 2014 - 08:22 AM

There are some things we need to think about when deciding what data to enter into a sentence and what data to enter in a note.

In a Family Group Sheet or Individual Summary, data in a sentence will not be available as the sentence is only printed for a Narrative report. And, if you export a gedcom to be opened with another program, the other program will probably not import RM's sentences.

Notes can be searched and a sentence can not be searched.

I have a Research log with each Research Item being a census year and a template for entering the census transcription in the Results box. Before I link a census fact to a person, I copy the transcription template from the Research item to paste in the Census note. I also have my most commanly used customized sentences in the Research item for that fact.

I use a question mark ? to show where I need to add individual data for a note in a note template, but I would not use it in a sentence as ? is used for a switch in a sentence as square brackets denotes a field in a sentence.

In a sentence template, I would use characters not used in a sentence for another purpose. A carat ^ or @ would be easy to see, and I would only have to delete 1 character, not 3.

However, it is your database and not the place of any other user to get irritated about what characters you use in a sentence to show you where to customize the sentence or any other way you enter data. One user is not right and another user is not wrong.

#6 motleycrew

motleycrew

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 8 posts

Posted 28 September 2014 - 08:07 PM

So this is the default sentence template for this fact type and you customize it for each instance by filling in the [#]s?

Yes, filling in the [#]s and deleting the phrases that did not apply to the person's agricultural products.

 

A different way (though not necessarily a better way) is not to involve RM's sentence template facility in this process at all. Rather, all this information could be placed in the census note. If you did it it that way, you could have sort of a pseudo-template in a text file somewhere that you could copy and paste into the census note where you could fill in the blanks. Which approach is better depends (I think) on how you want your data to read in a report and on how easy you want it to be to interchange your data with other genealogy software via GEDCOM.

 

Jerry

I'm glad you pointed out these issues, Jerry.  So far, I've done very little with Roots Magic in the way of reports or exporting via GEDCOM.  I thought it would be convenient to have the sentence template right there in the program

 

There are some things we need to think about when deciding what data to enter into a sentence and what data to enter in a note.

In a Family Group Sheet or Individual Summary, data in a sentence will not be available as the sentence is only printed for a Narrative report. And, if you export a gedcom to be opened with another program, the other program will probably not import RM's sentences.

Notes can be searched and a sentence can not be searched.

I have a Research log with each Research Item being a census year and a template for entering the census transcription in the Results box. Before I link a census fact to a person, I copy the transcription template from the Research item to paste in the Census note. I also have my most commanly used customized sentences in the Research item for that fact.

I use a question mark ? to show where I need to add individual data for a note in a note template, but I would not use it in a sentence as ? is used for a switch in a sentence as square brackets denotes a field in a sentence.

In a sentence template, I would use characters not used in a sentence for another purpose. A carat ^ or @ would be easy to see, and I would only have to delete 1 character, not 3.

However, it is your database and not the place of any other user to get irritated about what characters you use in a sentence to show you where to customize the sentence or any other way you enter data. One user is not right and another user is not wrong.

I was not aware of these limitations for sentences vs. notes.

 

Laura, thank you for the idea of having templates for each census transcription in a research log.  That is a brilliant idea.  I confess that I have not used the research log feature at all.  I'm going to go set up something similar in my database right now.  Also, I will take your advice on the characters to use in a sentence template.

 

Thanks to everyone for their comments.  I'm so glad that this forum exists so that we can benefit from others' experience!



#7 Laura

Laura

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4276 posts

Posted 28 September 2014 - 11:13 PM

I start the Research log names for things like fact structures and census templates with ZZ so they sort to the bottom of the list and are easy to find and are separated from my other Research logs.

We all learn from esch other on this forum whether we are new users or old users. I am glad RootsMagic provides the forum too.

#8 CherylCh

CherylCh

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 77 posts

Posted 06 December 2014 - 03:48 PM

I found this discussion while looking for a solution to fixing my imported (from TMG) CEN1880 through CEN1940 fact types, and maybe the 1850 through 1870 ones as well.  My chief problem is that, in RM, there's no way to use an alternate name in a sentence and I want somewhere to record the actual name and age of each individual as reported in the census.  I don't want a sentence that suggests that Sarah Farr was listed in the household of Jesse Newton Rogers in the 1880 census when she was actually listed as Sarah Rogers.  Same with ages - there are branches of my family where the women lie about their ages to such an extent you would think the enumerator would have had a hard time keeping a straight face.  But since I can put whatever I want in the note, no problem.

 

If I'm understanding this discussion correctly, then my sentence templates and associated roles can be greatly simplified.  The Principal sentence for the 1880 Census could be something like:  [Person] appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 Census of [Place:Plain].  I'd need only one Witness role with a sentence: [ThisPerson] appeared in the household of [Person] in the 1880 Census of [Place:Plain].  All the good stuff (names, ages, relationships) goes in the note.  I'm gradually getting away from the idea of computer-generated narratives because they sound like exactly what they are.  But I do want to see immediately, whether I'm using Timeline view or the Edit Person screen, where any gaps in census research are present.

 

I'm thinking of trying a tabular format for the Research Log entry, but I would appreciate any suggestions from users of this method.  Would it be better to use something more "sentence-like"?  I know I have the option of printing the Notes as part of reports, but as I understand it it's a per report decision. 

 

Cheryl