Jump to content


Photo

finding "certified" trees??

ancestry family search

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 DeaneHunter

DeaneHunter

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6 posts

Posted 26 March 2014 - 02:42 PM

I'm a newbie at all things genealogy... so forgive me if I may ask crazy questions :)

I'm kind of getting frustrated from finding a lot of data only to later find it is not correct.

Is there a way, on any of the search sites, to find only certified accurate data??
If so, I would like to start my searching there, and then go on and try to expand on that.

Right now, I'm feeling like... 2 steps forward, 3 steps back. Getting more confused and frustrated.

BUT, I am having fun...it's interesting finding out all this stuff!

I have been searching various sites off and on for a while. I just finally decided to buy a Ancestry membership.
Since I have family from England, France and Canada, I got a 6-month WORLD membership. ($99 for new members)

I also am easily led astray following all these crumbs..LOL
So, if anyone has any suggestions about how best to remain focused...etc. please let me know.

thanks,
Cliff

#2 Renee Zamora

Renee Zamora

    Advanced Member

  • Support
  • PipPipPip
  • 4152 posts

Posted 26 March 2014 - 03:59 PM

It's really important to look for original documents and work from them instead of going off anyone's compiled trees on websites. The compiled trees will just have one user submitting the information, or in the case of FamilySearch Family Tree, many different submitters. Compiled trees are just a person's conclusions about their research. Compiled trees on websites are the same quality as genealogy books which are compiled records by the author. Compiled records are usually not sourced and are only as good as the person's genealogy research skills are that put it together.

In Ancestry make sure to stay away from the trees and actually work from the historical records. The tree make a good starting point for where to look for the actually documents regarding those individuals.

Keep in mind that historical records may not even be accurate. Census records are only as good as the informant that told the information to the census taker. People lied on records for many reasons. You often need to gather all the records and then decide which is the most likely conclusion based on the records available.

The FamilySearch Research Wiki is an excellent resource in helping you learn more about record types, and what is available in a given area. Go to http://wiki.familysearch.org to get to the wiki. Another great resource on FamilySearch are the video collections they have. You can learn about all types of records and how to find and use them. Go to www.familysearch.org and under Get Help (top right corner) click on "Learning Center Video Courses". You also find the Research Wiki link on that same screen too.

The best way to stay focused and organized while researching is to use the RootsMagic Research Log. There is a webinar that will show you how to use it. You can also search for Research Logs on the FamilySearch Research Wiki to understand their importance.

Webinar #32 New Research Log and Manager in RootsMagic 5
www.rootsmagic.com/webinars
Renee
RootsMagic

#3 DeaneHunter

DeaneHunter

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 6 posts

Posted 26 March 2014 - 04:08 PM

Excellent info!
On a related note;
What is the proper thing to do when you come across a document that you know has some inaccuracies in it?
I can make a note on my record, I guess that's all.
thanks again,

#4 Renee Zamora

Renee Zamora

    Advanced Member

  • Support
  • PipPipPip
  • 4152 posts

Posted 26 March 2014 - 07:03 PM

When you cite your source in RootsMagic there is a tab called Detail Text. In the section called Research Notes you can make a transcription of what the document says. Below that section is the Comments where you can add your notes about the quality of the source, it's inaccuracies, etc.

Later if you need to you can use the Research Notes report to print out all your sources for the person, so you can review what you have on them. This will help with the analysis of your findings so you can determine your conclusion for their facts at that point in time.

New evidence comes along all the time that may make you change your conclusions. It doesn't mean your research was bad, over time with more records your conclusion just gets better.
Renee
RootsMagic

#5 Laura

Laura

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3381 posts

Posted 26 March 2014 - 08:18 PM

I wouldn't certify my own research. :)

I had a marriage for Ida in my database for years which I was sure was 99% the right one. There were no other Ida's in that county or surrounding counties which could be a different person than the Ida I was looking for in any census or other records. I also didn't find a marrage for her in the area her parents and brother moved to in Oklahoma.

But, not long ago I got in touch with one of her descendants and found out that she got married in Oklahoma in a County where her parents and brother did not live in that time frame to the best of my current knowledge and to a different man. I am sure the person I was in contact with was my Ida's descendant. I would still like to have some supporting sources and may find some in the future.

I enter comparisions of conflicting data or what I consider inacurracies in sources in the fact notes. I also enter the transciption from a source in the Detail text of the source as Renee suggested.

If you use a Research log for that person you will also want include any data and comments on the source in the Fesearch item.


Laura

The following was overheard at a recent high society party...
"My ancestry goes all the way back to Alexander the Great," said one lady. She then turned to a second woman and asked, "How far does your family go back?"
"I don't know," was the reply. "All of our records were lost in the flood."
-on various web sites-

#6 c24m48

c24m48

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1210 posts

Posted 27 March 2014 - 10:56 AM

I wouldn't certify my own research. :)


Totally agree. I never cease to be amazed about how many very official looking documents contain incorrect information.

Jerry