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Both Baptism and Christening are FACTS


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#1 Willy

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 08:38 PM

Both Baptism and Christening are FACTS. What is the difference between them? When should one be used rather than the other?

#2 Jack

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 12:30 AM

I guess the rite would be called by whatever name the ceremony was termed in the place where it took place. If in a Catholic church, I suspect it would be called a christening and, in a protestant church it would be called a baptism. Not sure what it might be called in other denominations (Jewish for example) but, those are the only two terms that I have ever heard used for that ceremony.
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#3 kbens0n

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 01:48 AM

In the absence of a Birth fact, Rootsmagic uses the Christening fact (if present) as a basis for calculating Age at various event junctures.

---
--- "GENEALOGY, n. An account of one's descent from an ancestor who did not particularly care to trace his own." - Ambrose Bierce
--- "The trouble ain't what people don't know, it's what they know that ain't so." - Josh Billings
---Ô¿Ô---
K e V i N


#4 TomH

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Posted 05 September 2013 - 05:31 AM

Dictionary definitions are very synonymous. Christen has a bit more emphasis or usage with respect to naming. Baptisms do occur for adults without naming.

Tom user of RM7550 FTM2017 Ancestry.ca FamilySearch.org FindMyPast.com
SQLite_Tools_For_Roots_Magic_in_PR_Celti wiki, exploiting the database in special ways >>> Rmtrix_tiny.png app, a bundle of RootsMagic utilities.


#5 Don Newcomb

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 06:53 AM

Both Baptism and Christening are FACTS. What is the difference between them? When should one be used rather than the other?

Someone, somewhere made a decision that "Christening" was a ritual that happened to infants and that "Baptism" happened later in life. Discussion of the religious arrogance of this decision is pointless. For the purposes of RootsMagic, the "Christen" fact implies birth when there is no "Birth" fact, the "Baptism" fact does not. Just use the "Christen" fact for infant baptisms. If you are like me and have hundreds of infant baptisms and no "Christenings" just change the sentence template to, "[person] was baptized (infant)< [Date]>< [PlaceDetails]>< [Place]>."

#6 kbens0n

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Posted 06 September 2013 - 08:03 AM

Someone, somewhere made a decision that "Christening" was a ritual that happened to infants and that "Baptism" happened later in life. Discussion of the religious arrogance of this decision is pointless.


This sounds like an unfair characterization to me. The ONLY "decision" that was made... was to use the more logical "near Birth" event (Christening) as the basis for age calculations in the absence of the Birth event itself, because a statistically-significant number of Baptisms occur too far later in an individual's life to be the basis for such age at event determinations.

IMPORTANT TIP for the original poster:

For the purposes of RootsMagic, the "Christen" fact implies birth when there is no "Birth" fact, the "Baptism" fact does not. Just use the "Christen" fact for infant baptisms. If you are like me and have hundreds of infant baptisms and no "Christenings" just change the sentence template to, "[person] was baptized (infant)< [Date]>< [PlaceDetails]>< [Place]>."


---
--- "GENEALOGY, n. An account of one's descent from an ancestor who did not particularly care to trace his own." - Ambrose Bierce
--- "The trouble ain't what people don't know, it's what they know that ain't so." - Josh Billings
---Ô¿Ô---
K e V i N


#7 JimL

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 09:08 PM

I guess the rite would be called by whatever name the ceremony was termed in the place where it took place. If in a Catholic church, I suspect it would be called a christening ...


In the Catholic faith baptism is performed for infants born into this faith and adult converts to this faith. I am not sure about Tom's reference to naming but the person's name is stated during the Catholic rite of baptism.

Older Catholic parish records (mid 1800s) are on microfilm for Toledo, Ohio at the county library but the records are in Latin. These baptism records name the infant being baptised, parents of the infant and the godparents.