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Who do you print FGS for?


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#1 JPCarolus

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 01:53 PM

I suppose it's a matter of personal preference, but just wondering what is "standard" practice, or even what other people do.
Is a FGS printed for married couples with no children, or is the info only recorded on the applicable parent's FGS?
I'm just curious...

#2 Nettie

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 07:06 AM

Yes I do print a FGS for married couples with no children, when I am working on a direct line family. You never know if have 'no children' is valid or not. But only printed in one of the two ways listed. In my case, most of the married couples with supposedly no children are usually siblings of direct line ancestors.

1. FGS is electronically transferred to my research report created in word...
2. Also if I am working on a lot of sources that I have not entered/documented in RM which has a lot of information to add to a family, I will print a FGS out and use that as my note taking sheet before entering the data into RM. I only print the main Sheets and the sources [ about 4 pages]. When work is transferred to RM then the FGS goes into the individual direct line or children of DL file. Stating on the hard copy FGS, the date I entered the information into RM and worked on.
Genealogy:
"I work on genealogy only on days that end in "Y"." [Grin!!!]
from www.GenealogyDaily.com.
"Documentation....The hardest part of genealogy"
"Genealogy is like Hide & Seek: They Hide & I Seek!"
" Genealogists: People helping people.....that's what it's all about!"
from http://www.rootsweb....nry/gentags.htm
Using FO and RM since FO2.0 = Researching the families of William DeCoursey/cy b. 1756 Baltimore Co. MD found father Leonard DeCause..

#3 JPCarolus

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 02:46 PM

If you KNOW they have no children, (specifically, I am thinking of my sister and her husband, who have no children and are of an age and adamantly stated mind-set that there will not be any), do they get a FGS in the family book? I am leaning toward yes, because there is much more information that shows on the FGS when you are the husband/wife than when you are a child. I am just wondering if there is a "standard procedure" for this in the genealogy world or do any of the societies have a standard?

#4 Laura

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:48 PM

The choice may depend on what you are doing with the FGS sheets.

If I was printing the FGS in ink to give to someone else and trying to save number of pages, and I had no data on the spouse other than the name and marriage date or other family facts which will print with the child, I might consider not printing a separate FGS.

If there are individual facts, such as birth date, other individual facts, or parents, I would print a separate FGS.

I don't know if there is a "standard procedure" for this in the genealogy world or if any of the societies have a standard,

There isn't much agreement on much of anything as a standard in the genealogy world. And, if some of the societies do have standards for printing FGS sheets, those standards will probably not agree with any other society's standard, you may as well please yourself unless you are submitting FGS sheets to a particular society.
Laura

The following was overheard at a recent high society party...
"My ancestry goes all the way back to Alexander the Great," said one lady. She then turned to a second woman and asked, "How far does your family go back?"
"I don't know," was the reply. "All of our records were lost in the flood."
-on various web sites-

#5 JPCarolus

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:00 PM

Fair enough. I have been doing this on my own with no formal or even informal education. In moving my mom's research onto the computer, some of which my sister had helped her out with, I noticed that Mom never made separate FGS unless the person had children, while my sister made out FGS for everyone regardless of whether they were married or not, and I wasn't sure what the purpose of that was. So I was just curious what everyone else was doing.

#6 Laura

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 03:16 PM

In RM, Family Group Sheets cannot be printed unless there are 2 people linked as a couple whether the couple ever married and have a marriage fact or not.

For a single person, you could print a Individual summary report, if you choose.
Laura

The following was overheard at a recent high society party...
"My ancestry goes all the way back to Alexander the Great," said one lady. She then turned to a second woman and asked, "How far does your family go back?"
"I don't know," was the reply. "All of our records were lost in the flood."
-on various web sites-

#7 Serenity20061

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Posted 16 December 2012 - 08:04 PM

Once I created my online tree, I quit printing any of the group sheets at all. I have a set of blank forms that I use when I am somewhere without internet access or my laptop, but for the most part of been entering information directly into my online tree for years. The only paper documents I keep at home anymore are the actual original documents that need to be preserved. I make a scanned copy, upload it to my tree and leave the original document savely tucked away. I found working electronically was more efficient (and legibile).

It is all a matter of preference. Each person finds an approach to managing their files, forms, and documents. For me, the binders became much too cumbersome to be of any real use, especially once I started taking trips to do research.